Heritage Quilters

Join the Heritage Quilters each Wednesday morning throughout the year at the Society’s museum at 6422 Main Street in Union. Quilters of varying levels of experience meet from 9:30 a.m. to about noon to work on a raffle quilt that benefits the not-for-profit Historical Society. For more information phone (815) 923-2267.

 

Members of the Gazebo Quilters Guild in Huntley launched a Quilts of Valor program in 2011, following a meeting at the McHenry County Historical Society Museum. Since that time the group of about 50 quilters has presented more than 1,000 patriotic quilts to deserving veterans. If you are a veteran or know of a veteran deserving of quilt, click HERE for an application.

Wednesday, January 8, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 15, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, February 5, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, March 5, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, March 12, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, May 21, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, May 28, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, June 4, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, June 11, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, July 2, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, July 9, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, July 23, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, August 6, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, August 20, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, August 27, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, September 3, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, September 10, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, September 24, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, October 1, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, October 8, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, November 5, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, November 12, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, November 19, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, November 26, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, December 3, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, December 17, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, December 24, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, December 31, 2014 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 7, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 21, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 28, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, March 4, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, May 6, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, May 13, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, May 27, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, June 3, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, July 15, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, August 5, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, August 12, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, August 19, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, October 7, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, October 21, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, December 2, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, December 9, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, December 16, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 6, 2016 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 13, 2016 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 20, 2016 - 9:30am
Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 9:30am

Upcoming Events

The Heritage Quilters meet at 9:30 a.m. each Wednesday at the museum.

July 21 – Saturday

McHenry County Fair, Woodstock. Historic photos of McHenry County. Quilt raffle. One-of-a-kind museum store items, fabric sale and books for sale.

Saturday, Aug. 11

Presented by Elizabeth Carlson in the 1867 Pringle School, 21596 River Road, just west of Route 23, in Marengo.

Free admission to the museum. Museum hours are from 1 to 4 p.m.

Old Fashioned “ base ball” match at Central Park, Grayslake.

Free admission to the museum. Museum hours are from 1 to 4 p.m.

10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

7 to 9 p.m.

Oct. 19, 20 and 21

Consider Joining The Heritage Quilters


Quilting is a rewarding hobby

Looking for opportunities to hone your quilting skills? How about the chance to work with others on a common project that perpetrates the quilters’ craft and supports the mission of the Historical Society? Perhaps you enjoy the socialization that quilting in a group provides.

Consider joining the Heritage Quilters each Wednesday morning throughout the year at the Society’s museum at 6422 Main Street in Union.

Quilters of varying levels of experience meet from 9:30 a.m. to about noon to work on a raffle quilt that benefits the not-for-profit Historical Society. Beginners are very welcome. Learn to quilt while making new friends. For more information phone (815) 923-2267 or email at info@mchsonline.org

In times past, quilts were made by women to provide necessary warmth for their families during cold and freezing winters. They were made from scraps and leftovers, and the job could be very boring and tedious.

Continuing a tradition begun back in 1984, quilters, want-to-be quilters and members of the McHenry County Historical Society Heritage Quilters gather at the Society’s museum at 6422 Main Street, Union on Wednesday mornings.

The annual quilt piecing party and pot luck luncheon is held in January of each year.

Quilts designed by this group are queen sized, varied in patterns and include a dedication and date on the back. The Society then sells raffle tickets throughout the year. The drawing takes place on the last Wednesday in October following a well attended quilt program.

A Brief History of Quilting

Many women turned this necessary chore into a creative outlet to break the endless drudgery of 18th and 19th century life.They began cutting their scraps and sewing them into interesting and beautiful patterns, thus creating a more colorful and cheerful environment for their families---especially during the long and dull winters when these beautiful quilts were taken out of their storage trunks and placed atop the beds.

Once the quilt top was pieced, it was placed in a frame and the long but necessary process of quilting the layers together began. Some utilitarian quilts were tied to provide quick warmth. However, the beautiful tops created to brighten the colonial and frontier homes were often quilted with beautiful, elaborate and loving stitches, forming a treasure to be proud of and cherish.

Often family members, friends and neighbors would come to assist the housewife who had a quilt in her frame. This time spent in jointly working on a long and tedious job became a social outlet for the quilters. These informal and friendly acts of kindness developed into what was referred to as a "quilting" and later as a "quilting bee". When word was sent through the community that on a designated day the housewife with a newly stitched quilt top would host a "quilting", all the friends and neighbors brought food and came early.

The large frames could hold a dozen or so quilters who made quick work of such a lengthy job. But the most important aspect of the "quilting" was the opportunity for women to get together and catch up on all the latest news and local happenings. This was a much needed social outlet for women who were often left home alone to care for the children, the farm and the animals while their husbands or fathers went to the nearest town to do the trading. Some quiltings even included the men who would come in the evenings after the chores were done and the frame was then put away and a dance might be held with music being provided by anyone who had an instrument. Thus quilting became a very important part of our heritage. - Nola Thompson